Ama, you mentioned the “refund rate” in your article but I believe that need a bit more explanation. Let’s take a down-to-earth example. We recently launched an affiliate campaign for our online coffee shop and got an affiliate who sent us a customer. The customer makes a $100 purchase. The affilite gets his $5. Soon a refund is requested (the client wanted a decaf coffee, for example). How do we deal with the $5 that we sent to the affiliate. What I expect is that we need to state the refund period (say, 7 days) and the affiliate money are released only after those 7 days. Is that correct?
GM and Frito-Lay and their agencies have recently figured out a great way of getting consumers more engaged with their brands, leveraging the new found power of the consumer. It's a great lesson in integrated marketing communications and engagement for all marketers.Both brands are running contests for consumers to create homemade commercials (also referred to as consumer generated content) for

ie first you need to haul ass and do something crazy, eg write a quality 20,000 word ebook (insanely not passive hahahah), but then you get to sit back and enjoy seeing PayPal sale messages pop up on your iPhone each morning as sale after sale after sale is made…on an ongoing basis and without any additional work. That’s some seriously Pina Colada flavored passive goodness!

With possibly the most transparent affiliate network online, we give affiliates access to stats no other program dare, including earning data, conversion stats, demographic information and seasonality trends. With ethics and consumer protection being high on the agenda, you can rest assured when working with MoreNiche you are working with an honest, trustworthy and transparent company.


Hey there, I’m Mahesh (@maheshone). I started learning and doing and experimenting web 2.0 stuff back in 2004 and eventually became a full-time computer nerd after graduation. Minterest is a digital marketing and technology journal that I founded in 2007 to feed my super curiosity (oh yeah, I’m a solo-blogger). I write about tech, marketing, and everything in between that excites me. And I love to work with small businesses to help them get the most out of the web. Outside of that, I'm equally passionate about the financial markets and I also spend a lot of time doing random things (see random facts about me). Say hi: @maheshone. Read More »
Hi Tommy. I vet the programs listed on my site and eliminate the ones that people make complaints about. But its important for you to also use your due diligence when you choose a program. Google the name of the company followed by queries such as “complaints” and “fraud” and “scam” to see if people are making accusations. You can also contact their affiliate manager directly to ask questions. If you can’t locate an affiliate manager that is definitely a red flag. Finally, diversify into a few different companies so you can compare them. Hope this helps. Sincerely – Bill
In this example, a blogger might put this link on their blog to try to get their readers to click through to your “blue widget” page and hopefully buy something. If the visitor who clicks on this link actually buys something, affiliate tracking software will automatically (usually – depends on what system you are using) pay your affiliate a percentage of the sale.

What can I expect to earn? We use a tiered revenue share model (25%-35%) that increases partner payouts as your monthly revenue increases. The amount of revenue generated per qualified lead depends on the industry and the size of the potential software buyer. We consistently generate more revenue for partners than alternative partners or ad networks.
We have “Carefully” scoured through ALOT of the “Affiliate Networks” in hopes of adding the right content for our visitors. The trueth is; whether it be the least popular networks OR the top notch programs, they each have various conditions which will screw you from generating revenue. Adding their links and promoting their advertisers is nothing more than a waste of YOUR time and YOUR webspace if you don’t get paid to have them there sooo, don’t get in a hurry to join any affiliate programs until you read through their “Terms & Conditions” thoroughly and completely!

I am currently in the process of desiging and setting up a blog, and am learning affiliate and product marketing more in depth. It is unfortunate that so many blogs just ‘dump’ a load of advertising and adsense and hope for the best, with no thoughts as to how their visitors view the barrage of ads. Make a living yes, but as Yaro points out dont drown your blog in affiliate products!

I think few of the most important factors that we must take in mind while searching for a good affiliate program to promote is that the product is priced not too high and not less so that we can get atleast a decent amount as commission. Also it is important to note the commission percentage, I think 50% and above is the best. We also should take notice that the product that we are thinking of promoting actually is related to our niche. Lifetime Cookie duration is also a must. Those are the most important factors that I search for when I try to search for a product but after reading this post I came to know about a few more stuffs that I should take notice of. Also, thanks a lot for including that additional resources, quite helpful. 🙂
*Yes: As you may have guessed, the link above is my two-tier affiliate link. There are a few of these links on this site to pay me a small commission and allow me to keep this site free instead of a monthly membership site. Using my two-tier affiliate link will not affect the amount of commission paid to you with this or any other program. My commissions are paid out of the vendor’s cut, not yours.
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